Garden Charter and Agreement, For All Interested Gardeners, Volunteers and Participants

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Enid Street Community Garden Charter and Agreement: 

Garden Charter:

  • We will aim to create a community atmosphere within the Garden group. By networking with other gardeners hopefully we can all learn, bumble along together, share the experience and work.
  • We welcome creative and novel types of gardens, including, but not limited to, inspirational vertical gardens; gardens on the roof sheds, aqua culture and water features.
  • Those with restricted mobility are welcomed and we will aim to accommodate individual needs in planning of the garden and or forming small groups to share plots.
  • Involvement can be at any level, whether you’re vaguely interested, want to help out occasionally, have an active garden bed, or even offer some of your skills as a volunteer.  We have many people working on different levels of involvement according to the time they have available or their trade skills that they may have to offer.
  • There will be an annual membership fee of $30 for plot holders and $10 for enthusiastic volunteers. This fee will cover our Incorporated status, public liability insurance and some marginal costs.  Fees will be payable annually.

Gardeners agreement:

Congratulations! You are about to embark on an adventure in gardening with the help of your friends and neighbours at Enid Street Community Garden! The agreement below helps us to operate as a healthy community organisation.

As a Enid Street Community Garden Member I agree to the following:

  • I will work, care for and maintain my plot. I understand that the opportunity to use my plot is a privilege, not a right, and as such I must use it or lose it.
  • As a plot holder, I will contribute to at least six working bees each year for general site maintenance and I happily agree to share what I can with the garden community.
      • As a supporting member I will contribute my knowledge, enthusiasm and muscles whenever I can.
      • If I do not pay my plot fees (as set by the Committee) on time I will forfeit my right to use the plot.
      • When I use the tools and equipment supplied in the shed I will return them to where I found them, use them safely taking into account those around me, and report any damaged equipment to a member of the committee.
      • I will not remove any garden property, including tools, from the premises.
      • I will respect the privacy of the house tenants at all times, and not attend the garden outside daylight hours.
      • I agree to keep weeds, trash, litter, etc. at a minimum and maintain the areas immediately surrounding my plot.
      • I will not plant crops which block sunlight from other plots or intrude in any other way upon the space outside my own plot.
      • I will not pick crops on plots of other members, unless given permission by that member.
      • I will use water responsibly.
      • I will use the compost and worm casings in a responsible manner, considering the needs of other community members.
      • I will garden within sustainable ecological parameters.
      • I will not use chemical pesticides or herbicides (e.g., roundup) in the garden.

I understand that neither the garden group nor owners of the land are responsible for my actions. I THEREFORE AGREE that ENID STREET COMMUNITY GARDEN, GARDEN MEMBERS, AND OWNERS OF THE LAND are not liable for any injury to me, or to my invited family and friends, nor for the loss of any of my possessions in connection with the use of the garden.

I have read and affirm and/or agree to abide by the above guidelines and agree to submit to the actions of the garden leadership concerning Enid Street Community Garden issues.

 

Signed ___________________________________ Date_____________________

This Garden is Going to Rock!

A bunch of us got together over the weekend and did some serious maintenance work. Kate M dropped off some potted plants. Albert, Tom, and Kate M mowed the grass and whipper snipped the edges. Julie entertained the kids for a while and also pulled up a very aggressive pumpkin type plant from our veggie plot. We have one new garden bed that Albert and Julie put together, it’s waiting for pony poo. I stood around with a baby on my back, sweating bullets and helping he kids to plant seedlings in the front garden bed. There are probably people and things I’m missing, but I think that’s the main gist of it all (sorry if I forgot anyone!).

We’re waiting to hear back on a grant application that was lodged by Kate M and another volunteer. Also, we’re waiting to hear back from Bunnings who, fingers crossed, will help us with our community initiative by providing material goods, like water tanks, hoses, access to seedlings, etc.

Stay posted for a beginning of the year social gathering. A little garden hangout, and then we will discuss the upcoming plans for the new year.

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Garden Meeting, Saturday 7 December, Come along and help!

7 December
4:00 NSW, 3:00 QLD  

There a several things needing attention in the garden.  If as many of us as possible could gather to lend a hand and knock it over it would be fun.

Julie & Albert are geared up to put together more garden beds, extra hands will assist construction.

Front area needs trimming and mowing. I should have our equipment up from our farm ready for action. if anyone has a spare mower or whipper snipper to bring this will help too.

Worm farm: review and start of next farm.

Rainwater tank: is on site but needs hands to lift onto pellets.

Trailer is on site:  a wood chip or moo poo run could also be under taken.

Meeting For All Those Interested, Sunday 10 November

November 10th, 4-5pm QLD time, 5-6pm NSW time

New starters or interested people welcome.  Just bring yourself, friends and kids…

Discuss further garden developments in the back, water and rainwater tanks, access, membership, use of new logo, social get together  to meet others, worm farm and compost programme, use of bee keeping equipment and shed access.

For those interested but don’t know “How it works” feel welcome to come along and have a chat.

Simply, a $30 annual membership fee (family);  you can have or share a plot, the shed will be stocked with equipment, you are welcome and free to come and go as you please and grow as you wish. Simple really.

But please:  only take from your own garden/ plot , you are not free to harvest from other plots, sharing with permissionis encouraged.

Please pass on this info to others who may be interested but not connected.

How To Get Involved with Enid Street Community Garden

The new worms getting ready to go in the worm farm.

The new worms getting ready to go in the worm farm.

As a community garden, we are open to all community input!  Every person has the potential to share great ideas, experience and advice, even if you have no experience in gardening.  If you’ve been thinking about getting involved with the community garden in Tweed, but you’re not quite sure where to start, or how things will run, here are a few ideas to consider.

  • Your involvement can be at any level, whether you’re vaguely interested, want to help out occasionally, have an active garden bed, or even offer some of your skills as a volunteer.  We have many people working on different levels of involvement according to the time they have available or their trade skills that they may have to offer.
  • There will be an annual membership fee of $20-30 to cover our Incorporated status, insurance and some marginal costs.
  • We will build a shed bank of tools for gardeners to use and share.
  •  An onsite compost pile has been created, plus a worm farm.
  • Once your plot is allocated you can grow how and what you wish, within sustainable ecological parameters.
  • If you wish to grow flowers, herbs, vegies or any combination it is entirely up you and / or  to the plot participants if you are sharing. The plot does need to be worked, cared and maintained; if you request, and are allocated, a plot and then don’t use or value it you may need to be asked to show cause.
  • We will aim to create a community atmosphere within the Garden group. By networking with other gardeners hopefully we can all learn, bumble along together, share the experience and work.
  • There is capacity for creative and novel types of gardens, a substantial  neighbouring wall could offer a challenge for inspirational vertical gardens; roof of sheds is available space also
  • Some may wish to try an aqua culture and water feature.
  • Those with restricted mobility are welcomed and we will aim to accommodate individual needs in planning the back section of the garden and or forming small groups to share plots.

For more information on ways you can get involved (at any level), email us at enidstreetcommunitygarden@gmail.com

or

visit us on facebook

Enid Street Community Garden Makes the News!

View the full story on the ABC website here!  I’ve copied and pasted the photo and story below :)

Big team effort!

One woman’s passion and vision has sparked an innovative community garden scheme in Tweed Heads.

 While numerous community gardens have sprung up locally in the past few years, this one is unique.

The land for the Enid Street Community Garden is a private block rather than council land.

Coolangatta’s Kate Miller saw the need for a community garden in the Tweed area, but land is scarce.

So when an Enid Street house block in Tweed Heads came up for sale, she bought it with the view to allowing locals to use it.

Her plans for the block range from building garden beds to providing a space for beekeepers and supporting local school children.

Garden of plenty

One of the area’s few remaining hardwood Queenslander-style houses stands on the 973-square-metre block.

Kate plans to renovate the house to allow a caretaker to live on-site.  Volunteers have started building garden plots at the front of the yard.  Students of the nearby St Joseph’s Primary School will be allocated some of the plots to grow almost anything they like.

“They can do as they wish as long as it’s legal,” she says.  The students planted strawberries as their first plants.

Busy bees

More garden plots will be built at the back of the house, as well as a couple of sheds.  One will be similar to a men’s shed; the other will house equipment to help amateur beekeepers in the area.

Kate, who keeps bees herself, explains: “We’ll set up a bee shed where they can bring their honey boxes and extract their honey and then take their boxes back to their own hive.”

“That supports beekeeping without having to have all the equipment and it makes [a space for the] community where they can come and do it together,” she adds.

Growing the vision

Kate’s vision is that this is the first of many similar projects in the area.  “I would like to think down the track this might become a model,” she says.  “If there are people living in large houses with backyards, they might say to their neighbours who may be living in flats or duplexes or more densely populated buildings: ‘We’ve got some space in the backyard. Would you like to come and make a plot and share a garden and build that sense of community?’”

But why has she invested so much of her own money into this community project?

“I would like to think at the end of my life I’ve given something back to a community, and [this is] an area which I absolutely love,” she says.

“And I would like to make a model for our children that at the end of our days, we can look back and say what did we contribute; that’s all really.”

You can follow their progress on the Enid Street Community Garden blog.